Indonesia’s parliament has delayed deliberation on its controversial bill to amend the country’s criminal code, which seeks to ban gay and extra marital sex in some instances.

The extension, which affects 11 other bills, was agreed on Friday morning during a general session of the lower house, according to statement on parliament’s website. The statement did not set a deadline for passage of the revised code.

Parliament’s move comes amid signs the government of President Joko Widodo is watering down some of the bill’s more restrictive conditions to ensure passage of the revised criminal code, which includes laws that date back to the Dutch colonial era. Efforts to update the code, which numbers more than 700 articles, date back to the 1980s

In early March, the Widodo administration backed off outright bans on sex outside marriage, making police involvement contingent on complaints from close family.

Consensual gay sex has also been spared criminalization. The most recent proposal, submitted to parliament in early March,limits prohibition of gay sex in the case of rape and or in public.

But activists say the revised changes amounts to a ban in all but name. Previous mentions of gay sex were limited to prohibition of sex with minors. Expanding the ban, even marginally, may open the statute to abuse by police and judges who tend to see themselves as an echo chamber of popular sentiment, says Maidini Rahmawati, a researcher at the Jakarta based Institute for Criminal Justice Reform.

“The expanded mention of gay sex is troubling,” Rahmawati says.

“We worry that police will act arbitrarily to enforce public morals.”

Last year Indonesian police arrested more then 200 gay men in separate raids on saunas and parties. Existing laws against sex in public places, under the 2008 pornography law, were the pretext for the detentions even though gay sex is nominally legal here.

While most detainees are eventually released, police typically publish their names and at times photos. More than a dozen are serving sentences of about two years.

The proposed changes have sparked protests and international condemnation.

Nearly 110,000 people have signed an online petition in opposition of the proposed changes. In February the UN Human Rights Commissioner Zeid Ra’ad Al Husseincalled the changes “inherently discriminatory” during a visit to Jakarta.

Even so, with a presidential election almost exactly a year away, lawmakers say they are eager to finally bring to an end the decades long effort to revise the criminal code. A vote may be slated for before Independence Day on Aug 17, Rahmawati says.